“Fighting for Girls” reviewed

“Informed by feminist perspectives and contemporary research and theory in psychology, sociology and criminal justice, readers searching for information regarding the truth about the stereotypes of violent girls will not find a better, broader, or more in depth discussion of this issue than in Fighting for Girls.”

Helen LaCrosse Levesque of Indiana University reviews “Fighting for Girls” for the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Volume 40, No. 4, April 2011.

If you have access to this journal through your library, this is definitely a review worth reading. Levesque does mini-reviews of each of the book’s chapters.

Her overall conclusion:

What is notable about Fighting for Girls is that, in one volume, readers are presented with not only ten new investigations but also with discussions of findings from hundreds of other studies all pointing to the same conclusion: girls simply are not more violent than in past. Moreover, Fighting for Girls goes further and critically addresses why, given the evidence that they are, if anything, less violent than in past, girls are being arrested and incarcerated in ever greater numbers. From multiple perspectives, the volumes’ contributors offer detailed discussions of the personal, social, cultural and political factors behind this contradiction. Informed by feminist perspectives and contemporary research and theory in psychology, sociology and criminal justice, readers searching for information regarding the truth about the stereotypes of violent girls will not find a better, broader, or more in depth discussion of this issue than in Fighting for Girls.

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